Smooth Sailing — Well, Pretty Much.

23 11 2011
Me, Don and Theo, testing one of the sky lanterns for the Dec. 3 Sky Lights of Love Benefit. Photo by Kristi Rugh Kahl.

Test runs are important. We learned just how important last Sunday, when Don, Theo and I met at Van Buren Park with Sky Lights of Love Organizer Kristi Kahl and her son, Logan, and friends Jodi and Randy Krueger, to give it a try, figure out the logistics.

I’d never seen a sky lantern up close until my bff Kristi pulled up with a half dozen or so samples. I was surprised by how BIG they are! Even though I’ve seen them in pictures and in videos, I never realized their size. They must easily be three feet tall once they’re fully inflated and ready for lift-off.
The picture of me, above, sending a pink ribbon sky lantern into the skies looks like it went off without a hitch. It did — until it got snagged in a tree. So, though the outlook point at the park, which overlooks gorgeous Belleville Lake, was great in theory, we realized then and there that there are just too many trees. So, we moved to a nearby open field, where, once we got the lanterns lit, they expanded with air and took off. And all of us breathed sighs of relief.
These babies remind me of miniature hot air balloons in both the way they look as well as how they soar into the sky. They ascend higher than I ever imagined. After several minutes, they’re still going up, up, up — until the naked eye can no longer spot them. I love that. They then self-extinguish at some point and fall to the ground. They are biodegradable, so no harm done. Just lots of love and wishes sent into the night sky.
The mechanics are pretty simple, once you get them down. That’s what we worked on with several of these lanterns Sunday — and after a few trial runs and burn marks (on the sides of the lanterns, not us!), we’ve got it. At the Dec. 3 Benefit, I will give everyone a run down of how to do a safe lift-off via the PA system, and we will have people roaming through the crowd to help.
There’s still time to join us. Lanterns can be purchased through Sunday, November 27. We will be sending up a number of the pink ribbon lanterns like the one shown above, but also, some beautiful In Memory Of lanterns that I just this week realized are available. They are white with gold trim and there is a large tag on the top on which we will be writing the name of the person or people indicated by the purchaser. There is a section on the PayPal order form where you can indicate if you’d like to light one off in someone’s memory — or, if you are unable to attend, we will do it for you. The sentiment on the memory lanterns is beautiful: In memory of those who have left us, may this light rise to the heavens to shine with you for all eternity.
To order a lantern, click here, or go to the Events tab on the blog’s homepage and look under Upcoming Events. If you have questions, please feel free to contact Kristi Kahl at kristikahl@comcast.net. If you have already placed an order, and would like to designate a lantern In Memory Of, but haven’t yet done so, please email Kristi. Also, if you are planning to attend the event, please drop Kristi a quick email and let her know. We are looking forward to filling the sky with light, hope and love with all of you on Dec. 3.
Copyright 2011, Amy Rauch Neilson
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“I’m Gonna Love You Through It.”

14 10 2011

A couple of times early on after my diagnosis, Don called me from work to say he’d lined up a sitter for Theo and that he’d like to take me out to dinner. Just the two of us.

Sounds romantic. And it is. Except.

Except that I was gripped by this terrible, irrational fear that he was going to tell me he couldn’t do this anymore, go along with me on this journey.

So, when we got to Carrabba’s and I was looking like a deer caught in the headlights rather than a wife out with her husband on a Friday night, he was confused.

“What’s wrong?” he asked once we were seated in our booth. “Did you want to go somewhere else?”

I stared at the table for a moment, then worked up the courage to say, “I’m afraid you’re going to tell me you can’t do this anymore.” And how could I blame him, really? This, my second cancer diagnosis in five years, the first coming when Don was just 32, me, 37.

Don reached across the table and covered my hands with his.

“I just want to have dinner with the woman I love,” he said. “I’m not going anywhere.”

It isn’t all that irrational if you look at the statistics — as many as 50 percent of marriages dissolve after a cancer diagnosis.

But we all know that when you’ve got the Real Deal — a hubby like mine — statistics are bunk.

It was silly. But I was scared.

A few days ago, Don sent me the most beautiful music video by Martina McBride that captures what this whole journey is all about. Then, this morning, my neighbor, Sue, sent it to me as well.

Me and my hubby, enjoying a ride on our pontoon boat. I just watched it. Again. And cried. Again. But they were very happy tears and a reminder that while the journey is tough, so much of what comes out of it can indeed be beautiful.

It is amazing. But a word of caution before you press “play” — grab a box of Kleenex first. (Click on Martina McBride’s name, above, and it will take you to the video.)

Copyright 2011, Amy Rauch Neilson








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