Blood, Sweat, and Tears…But Not in That Order

16 04 2011

Image Courtesy of the American Red Cross.

There was blood, sweat, and tears yesterday, but not in that order.

First came the tears.

Friday was Parent/Teacher Conference Day at Theo’s school. I pride myself on being organized and efficient. I claimed our slot the first day the sign-up sheets were posted. Then, I came home and marked it on our family calendar. I’m sure somewhere in my subconcious, this thought lurked: I may be fighting breast cancer, but I can still manage our daily life with the best of ’em!

I thought our conference was at 10:20 a.m. I would have bet money on it. Big money.

So, when we arrived at 10:15, I thought we were right on schedule.

Not.

There was another parent waiting awkwardly in the wings as Theo’s teacher explained that we were late; our 20-minute conference slot had been at 10 a.m.

There was a perfectly reasonable solution to this problem — 11 a.m was wide open and in the meantime, we could meet with Theo’s music teacher. But I broke down sobbing anyway. Right there, in the school lobby.

That should have been my first clue.

I pulled myself together — well, mostly — and we met with Theo’s music teacher and then his classroom teacher. They are both terrific and, despite my earlier breakdown, it went well.

Next, the sweat.

My bff Anita Griglio Kelly chauffered me to yesterday’s chemo infusion. I was feeling pretty weak when we arrived, but I was determined to get my treatment. I had chills, then sweats, then chills again. That mystery was short-lived after the lab results of blood drawn when I arrived at the Infusion Center came back. Although I’d had an infusion of Procrit on Tuesday in an effort to raise my red blood cell counts, they had continued to plummet. I needed two units of blood, asap.

Finally, the blood.

Following my chemo infusion, I went straight to the ER, where the doctors and nurses prepared me for the first blood tranfusions of my life. I’d been on the giving end many a time. It was a bit surreal to be on the receiving end.

My blood was sent to the lab to confirm and reconfirm that my blood type is indeed A+, then “cross-matched” for other markers that would indicate which packets of the donor blood available were the least likely to be rejected by my body.

Finally, two units of the most beautiful crimson liquid I’ve ever seen in my life arrived in Room 8 of the ER. Might as well have been liquid gold. The nurse accessed my port and the tranfusions began.

During the next six hours, as I watched the blood slowly drip from the bag and travel through clear plastic tubing to the port in my chest, I wondered who it was who had been kind, generous, and selfless enough to donate blood for a complete stranger. I would never know.

But if I could, I would tell that person that their gift restored and rejuvenated the Mom of a little five-year-old boy named Theo and the Wife of a loving husband named Don who just yesterday told me that he is treasuring every day we have together on this planet. I’d tell them that I went from a woman so low on “fuel” that she could barely sustain a simple Parent/Teacher conference earlier that day, to one who cooked a breakfast of french toast and bacon with her family the very next morning. Most of all, I’d say two simple words: Thank you.

Several times last evening I looked up at that donor bag of blood and thanked God that there was someone out there who was willing to give it, destination unknown.

So, although I am humbled and grateful for the many people who are stepping forward to donate blood on my behalf, designated specifically for me should I need it in the upcoming months, I also have another request.

Whether or not you are A+, whether or not you can help me specifically, please give blood.

There are lots of “Amys” out there who desperately need it. Go to The Red Cross website and make an appointment. There are convenient donation sites all around, it takes but a few minutes, and it is truly a life-changing gift.

Copyright 2011, Amy Rauch Neilson

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Oh, Great Crappy Day!

14 04 2011

Today, I felt physically horrible. Yet, great things happened.

Physically horrible because not only are my white blood cell counts down — which meant Don has had to give me shots of Neupogen the past two nights, the injection that helps my white counts to recover, but makes every bone and muscle in my body ache in the process.

This Chemo Round, there’s also the added complication of a low Hemoglobin count. Tuesday’s chemo was a game-time decision; the doctors considered my counts before finally deciding to go ahead with my infusions. I was given an extra infusion of a drug called Procrit on Tuesday along with my standard chemotherapy drugs, in the hopes that my counts will recover and I will not need a transfusion.

But speaking of great things, I was humbled and deeply touched by the number of people who stepped forward yesterday and today to offer to roll up their sleeves and donate their blood for me, in case I do need a transfusion. Don’t ever bother to tell me there aren’t a lot of wonderful, giving people in the world, because I won’t believe you. Not for a second. I’ve seen way too much to the contrary to ever believe anything else.

And on to more great things — today, I heard from television, print, and radio media regarding upcoming interviews to help get the word out there about my story, the unlikelihood of this diagnosis after all of the preventative measures I took and the aggressive treatments I underwent, and the hope that this information will help to save lives, many lives through better methods of self-examination post-mastectomy as well as monitoring.

I have dreamed of starting a foundation for more than two decades. I wasn’t sure exactly what shape it would take, but I’ve always wanted to find a way to help people on a large scale. I think the pieces of the puzzle of just how that will happen in my life are beginning to fit together.

I had the good fortune to end up spending more than two decades as a financial writer/editor, which means I have acquired a good understanding of investment vehicles and how they work. My plan is to use this background down the road to manage the financial end of my foundation to help all donations and revenues to grow and thrive so that the funds can help as many people as possible.

I see the foundation as growing out of http://www.itsinthegenes.org in a multi-faceted way. I have big plans, many of which I am already moving from the planning stages into the actual implementation of the ideas.

It’s all, always, in God’s time. And He, no matter how confusing or difficult the circumstances in which you find yourself, is always right.

Copyright 2011, Amy Rauch Neilson








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